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News

Saturday Selections – Feb. 23, 2019

Doing Jordan Peterson one better   Jordan Peterson has inspired many a young man struggling with aimlessness. But Peterson isn't Christian, so his answers can only go so far. While Peterson can't answer life's biggest questions, God can, so David Murray has created the Christian Man Academy, to share God's thoughts on what it means to be a man. Learn more at the link above, and below you can get a sampling of what's offered, this one tackling the subject of "Real men repent." Practical thoughts on raising selfless children Are we raising our children to be good future husbands and wives? Or are we raising them to think that their recreational schedules should dictate parents' schedules and that while others need to sacrifice for them they don't need to sacrifice for others? (Prov. 22:6)? What does Paul mean when he says ‘let a woman learn quietly?’ (10-minute read) Some thoughts on 1 Timothy 2:8–14 and women teaching in the Church. The Empty Planet – under not overpopulation the real concern Two points worth noting about overpopulation fears: They were always unbiblical. God describes children as a blessing, not the curse that overpopulationists have treated them as. But Christians were largely swayed by the "experts" and their fearmongering, and started having smaller families too, and didn't speak out as loudly as we could have. But, now, as this article shows, it's becoming evident to everyone that "population bombs" were mere hysteria. We blew it by not loudly and aggressively fighting the overpopulation hype and it meant millions died, as this hype was used to push abortion worldwide.  Now, when scientific experts are telling us that carbon is deadly, will we learn from our previous mistake? Every new child comes with its very own carbon footprint, so there is pressure once again to minimize the population. You don't need a philosophy of education to home-school If there are no good Christian schools nearby, don't worry - you can homeschool. Sure, it might seem intimidating, what with all the different curriculum choices out there. "Choices are great, but when they become too overwhelming, we need to be reminded of simplicity....All you really need to homeschool is a Bible, a library card, and a math book.” The Moses Controversy trailer This trailer almost makes it look like an attack on the Bible, but these guys are on the right side. Could be very interesting...

Economics, News

The $33/hr minimum wage?

As of January 1, the minimum wage in New York City was boosted to $15 an hour, a more than doubling of the $7.25 minimum wage of just six years ago. Three days later The New York Times published a piece with the provocative title: The $15 Minimum Wage Is Here. Why We Need $33 an Hour. Author Ginia Bellafante didn’t exactly demand $33 as a new minimum wage or at least didn’t set a timetable to reach that number. She did argue that the new $15 minimum wouldn’t do much to meet New York City workers’ needs and “the war” for an adequate living wage had to continue. Bellafante cited a report by New York’s largest food bank, City Harvest, which calculated that a “single parent with two school-age children…would need to make nearly $69,427 a year” which works out “an hourly wage of just under $33.” But is need a good basis for a minimum wage? If a single mom needs $33, a married couple with two kids could get by with just half that. So maybe $15 is a good number after all? But then what of that single mom? And what if, instead of just two kids, she had four? Then she would need a lot more than just $33, so should we be looking at a $50 minimum wage, or even higher? If you see a problem with that idea, you’re recognizing something that many minimum wage proponents do not – that the basis for wages isn’t employees’ needs. Consider our own buying habits. We don’t buy a car from Ford because Ford needs the money – that’s not a consideration. When we head to Safeway and find out that a dozen bagels are on sale for $5 we might buy them. But not at $10 a dozen – they aren’t worth that to us. So whether we buy them or not depends on what value they return to us for the money we have to hand over. It’s no different when employers buy labor. They aren’t buying our labor out of a charitable impulse – they are looking to get good value for their money. And like us, if something is overpriced, they aren’t going to buy. That’s why a minimum wage of $50 would be disastrous. Many of us aren’t worth $100,000 a year to an employer so if $50 were the minimum wage, we would be out of work. We would be unemployed because our labor was overpriced by government mandate. While $15 is a lot lower than $50, not everyone is worth that either. Unskilled workers might not be able to produce $10 or even $5 an hour of value, or at least not until their employer trains them. If the law says they have to be paid $15/hr that makes them unemployable. It may not even be the unskilled worker who pays the price. Take as example a business that employed high school students at minimum wage, and also employed a single mom who made a bit more. When the owner needed help running the business he began training the single mom to become a manager, and increased her salary to go along with the new responsibilities. Then the minimum wage went up and the owner had to increase the pay of all his high school students. That money had to come from somewhere and the end result was that the owner had to let his manager-in-training go, because he had to use her wages to pay the students. This government-mandated increase, legislated as a means of helping the poor, didn’t help her. High schoolers who had already been happy with their wage got more, but a single mom lost a good job. The government might have meant well, but they didn’t do well. There is a Christian case to make against the minimum wage and any number of verses could be cited. Prov. 14:31 tells us to be kind to the poor, and while that is the professed intent of the minimum wage, that is not its effect on the least skilled. Just as relevant is Prov. 27:14 which tells us that mere good intentions are not enough – we actually have to be kind. In the online discussions of this article Luke 6:31 was raised: "Do to others as you would have them do to you," as in employers should pay their employees what they would think fair, were their positions reversed. True enough, but this verse is applicable the other direction too. Don't want your job banned? Then don't ban other people's jobs. There are any number of reasons why someone might be happy to work for wages below a government-mandated minimum. Someone might want to work for free as an intern instead of spending thousands learning the same skills in university. Low-skilled or no-skilled workers might want to get a foot in the door so they can work their way up to higher paying positions. Some low-paying jobs have fringe benefits, like a parking lot attendant I knew who could do his university homework during his shift. Mentally handicapped people who can't do as much as others might still enjoy work. Elderly folks who can't move as quickly as they once did might appreciate a job that doesn't demand a high output. And students might prioritize flexible hours over big bucks. Do these sound like positions that need to be banned? Should it be the government's job to make working for less than $15 a crime? God warns against arrogance (Daniel 4:30) but when a government makes minimum wage laws it is making decisions for millions and presuming it can price the value of people's labor better than they can themselves, and better than individual employers can. Our governments are trying to manage our economy in a hands-on way that requires them to be near all-knowing and have miraculous powers. But they are not God, and they can not make everyone worth $15/hr. by government decree. In humility, our governments need to recognize that their powers and knowledge are limited, and they are simply not up to that task of running an economy. Is it any wonder, then, that God never asks them to? This article has been expanded by a couple of paragraphs to answer some of the questions the original version prompted. ...

News

Saturday Selections – Jan. 26, 2019

For C.S. Lewis geeks only A new introduction to The Screwtape Letters has been found, and it turns out this manuscript didn't first fall into Lewis's hands, but rather a far-travelling professor friend of his. The media botched the Covington Catholic story In one of the more outrageous bits of media bungling, a group of Catholic kids at the US March for Life were condemned as racists and bullies by a media mob that wasn't interested in hearing their side of the story. And as WORLD magazine's Megan Basham noted, Christians were just as quick to jump to judgment. Who owns a woman's body? It's not who you think. Abortion advocates will chant "My body! My choice!" and pro-lifers will counter "The unborn are not your body." But even pro-lifers have it only half right. "It's not fair!" Jay Younts explains that every child's (and many a parent's) desire to get what's coming to them "is to live like a fool, to live as if there were no God..." Dutch pastors face possible criminal investigation for signing Nashville Statement Dutch pastors are facing a public backlash after hundreds took a public stance for God's views on sex. Psalm 23 from the Corner Room ...

Apologetics 101, News

Abortionist: “God performs way more abortions than I do…”

In a Dec. 29 tweet abortionist Leah Torres went viral by claiming: “God performs way more abortions than I do…” While pro-lifers were quick to respond, most failed to offer an effective reply. When we debate the world there can be a temptation to assume anything they say must not be true. That's what happened here, with many a Christian afraid to concede there was something to Torres’ claim, at least as far as it went. And because this uncomfortable truth was avoided, the rebuttals missed their target. The newsgroup LifeNews.com tweeted this reply: “But you believe in evolution. So it’s evolution’s fault, not God’s.” Maybe Torres does believe in unguided evolution, but the largely Catholic LifeNews presumably doesn’t. So why not offer a Catholic or Christian response, instead of this evasion? Faithwire.com thought another reply, a tweet by ToniMZ81, was worth sharing, but it also sidestepped the real issue. She wrote: “…most miscarriages are because of an issue with the pregnancy/ non viability & most abortions are viable pregnancies.” What this forgets is Who controls viability. There is a difference between an abortion and a miscarriage, but this tweet didn’t get to the heart of it. The difference is not that Torres takes life and God does not. The difference is that God is the Author of life and Torres is not. As the Source of life He has a right to take what He has given. Torres does not. This point was made by a few pro-lifers. Greg Schultz tweeted: There’s a difference… You Are Not God Taken to its logical end, Torres' argument justifies every sort of murder at any age because, after all, God has killed more people of that age, than any of us have. To highlight the incredible wickedness of this logic, Anthony Abides, in the most memorable tweet of them all, put Torres' self-justification in Hitler's mouth: “God killed more Jews than I do.”...

News

26 richest people own as much as the world's poorest 3.75 billion

The 26 richest people on the planet hold as much wealth as the poorest 50% of the world’s population. So says the Oxfam Inequality Report 2019 released this January. That quite the statistic – it’s a disparity that will surprise and stun many. But why is Oxfam sharing it? To foster covetousness. Of course, that’s not how they present their case. They speak of fairness. They think it obviously unfair that the 26 people at the top have as much as the 3.75 billion on the bottom. But what the report doesn’t detail is how these 26 got their wealth. No accusations of theft are made. We know God hates for the powerful to oppress the poor (Prov. 22:16, 22-23) but Oxfam doesn’t even try to make the case that this is how the rich gained their money. The report details the dire circumstances the poor face around the world, but no linkage is made between their poverty and wickedness done by the rich. Still, isn’t it obviously wrong that so few have so much, when so many have so little? To answer that question properly, we need to view things biblically. In Scripture we find God repeatedly calling on us to help the poor (Prov. 28:27, 31:9, etc.). And at the very same time in the 10thCommandment – Do not covet – He makes it clear He doesn’t want us concerned with what the rich have. Poverty is a problem to be tackled, but the God who made Solomon wealthier than any before him nowhere speaks of “fixing” wealth inequality. How can the God who wants us to help the poor also tell us not to concern ourselves with the wealth of the rich? Aren’t the two related? No. That’s the lesson the Oxfam needs to learn. Abraham prospered, but his increased wealth didn’t come at the expense of anyone else (Genesis 14:23). Similarly, a successful businessman doesn't become rich by taking from the poor. Unless he steals, the only way he can become wealthy is by making others wealthier too. He can only sell us his $10 widget if we think he’s delivering more than $10 worth of value. After all, if we don’t think it's worth more than the asking price, why would we trade our money for it? If we do make that exchange, not only is the widget-maker wealthier (he’s up $10!) we're wealthier too because we now own a widget that’s worth much more than $10 to us! The Oxfam Report laments the wealth of the super-rich. They see it as representing good that could be, but isn't being, done – they see it as good withheld. What they don't understand is that this wealth represents enormous good already done – every dollar representing more than a dollar’s worth of wealth given to their customers. (And we haven't even touched on how these 26 people’s wealth is tied up in companies that bring further benefits by employing millions.) There will always be a temptation to look over our back fence at what our rich neighbor has. But when God calls on us to help the poor, He's calling on us to help the poor....

News

Most overlooked articles of 2018

We've previously shared a Top-10 list of RP's most popular posts of 2018. While every article on that list was fantastic, not every fantastic article was on that list – in fact, some of 2018's best articles managed to fall through cracks in the Internet and get almost entirely overlooked. But because they deserved better we've gathered them up and are shining the spotlight on them one more time. Without further adieu, here are some of the best, overlooked articles of 2018. Very helpful book reviews 12 ways your phone is changing you We live in a very different world than just 10 years ago - always connected, and yet increasingly disconnected. How does a Christian live with suffering? It's a question we'll all ask at some point... Insightful, incredibly creative fiction Hamlet with a happy ending What if the author of the story wanted to save Hamlet and was willing to step into the story to do it? Report of a meeting that was never held As this first-century meeting makes clear, we can be confident the apostles didn't edit the Bible. On the origin of articles Some silly sorts think articles are designed, but, as this article makes plain, they aren't designed – they evolve! Parenting On reading together Reading with your children is a wonderful way to teach, encourage, and bond with them. Discipline or punishment When it comes to discipline and punishment, parents do you know which you should, and which you shouldn't, be doing? And do your children understand the difference too? Evangelism and apologetics I love apologetics Ray Comfort, on how apologetics and evangelism are not as complicated as we sometimes make them out to be. Disarming a name caller by asking them to explain their insult The quickest way to put a thoughtless critic in their place is to ask them to actually explain their criticism. Paul vs. James: Dealing with Bible difficulties and Dealing with the Bible's difficult texts Bible critics want to confound us with supposed difficulties and contradictions in the Bible. Here are a couple quick takes on how to respond in faith, and with confidence. Humor What is humor? In a world that's increasingly comedic, Christians need to know how to use humor to point to the Truth. And the first step involves seeing humor as God sees it. Insights from the Devil's dictionary The creator of the Devil's dictionary wasn't Christian, but, some of his definitions were hilariously insightful. The very best pro-life signs! Humor can be used as a weapon for Truth. Here are some great examples. BONUS: On economics, dating, and deformers G.K. Chesterton on the difference between reformers and deformers The rich get richer by making us all wealthier Faint heart never won fair maiden...

News

Saturday Selections - Dec. 29, 2018

Mutations show devolution, not evolution (3 min) Beneficial mutations do happen, but they happen via a loss of information. And such information-losing mutations offer no explanation for molecules-to-man type evolution. These beneficial mutations are, in fact, examples of devolution. Don't give your kids smartphones. Let them use yours. Tedd Tripp with one brilliant tip to help teach our children to navigate the online world. How to protect your kids in the online world An article, and 12-minute video, with tips like: "First, you are not primarily your kids’ friend. You’re their parent. So you should parent them." and "You bought the phone. You control the TV. You control the Internet. You set the boundaries in your house." The perils of banning "fake news" Do we really want governments, and social media companies like Facebook, becoming the arbitrators of free speech? That sort of cure could be far worse than the disease. Is 10,000 steps a day a magic number? Some thoughts on the 10,000 steps more and more of us are trying to get each day. What DNA duplication might look like (3 min) Watch this and consider how much thought and intention and creativity would be needed to design a complex robot that could replicate itself. ...

News

Saturday Selections - Dec. 22, 2018

Young love: what are you waiting for? When we get married isn't always under our control. But there is a trend in the world, and reaching into the Church, to put off marriage until all our ducks are in a row. But does that give marriage the prominence it deserves? Rev. Jerrold Lewis offers 7 reasons to consider marrying early. (One caution: his divorce statistics, while commonly cited, are wrong - the real divorce rate is may be as low as 25%, and lower still in the Church.) The pay gap myth that just won't die Have you heard that women make just 77 percent of what men make? This wage-gap myth is based on averaging what all women make and comparing that to what all men make. It is an oversimplification that doesn't factor in is the different jobs, the different risks, and different amounts of overtime the two genders engage in. It turns out that when it comes to careers and family life, men and women have different priorities. An end of the year marriage check-up This is two years old but Kevin DeYoung's questions are just as helpful at the end of 2018. The Mike Pence rule spreads to Wall Street "Some women object, but it's one answer to #MeToo." When the public school tries to indoctrinate your kids about homosexuality The public school system is an arm of the government, and will often teach at cross-purposes to you, the parent. While you can ask that your child be allowed to skip certain classes – maybe the sex-ed classes – the administration may or may not agree. Even if they do allow it, the ungodly propaganda is so pervasive now, it isn't a matter of one class here or there. Consider these two examples: it's been ten years since the BC government agreed to let a same-sex couple rewrite the provincial curriculum to make it more homosexual-friendly, and just this year an Alberta school was involved in handing out explicit instructions on "safe" homosexual sex – a pictorial flip book – to a 13-year-old. So long as your children are in this system, you won't be able to shield them from the peer pressure coming at them from indoctrinated classmates (who will be happy to fill them in on everything that happened in the class they skipped) or from the influence of those you've put in authority over them – their teachers. You can blunt the worst of this impact via private schooling or home-schooling – by getting your children out of a system set on separating them from God – but even then they'll be impacted via neighborhood friends. So how can you innoculate your children against these influences? Amy K. Hall has help to offer, and it starts with coming alongside your children and talking through God's perspective, even as they are exposed to the secular perspective. The secret code of creation (1 hour) You don't have to understand this all to be blown away. A lecture unlike any you've heard before on the intriguing code God has built into numbers themselves. ...

News

RP's 2018 in review...and plans for the future

To see what Reformed Perspective has been up to, and hear about our plans for the future, check out our 2018-year-in-review video below. If you like the work we're doing, will you consider becoming a month supporter? Help us "equip and encourage Christians to think, speak, and act in a manner consistent with their confession." You can find out how on our donors page here. You can also find us via: The RP Roundup (our weekly email newsletter), Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. ...

News

Saturday Selections - December 8, 2018

Christian professor pressured to call male student by female pronouns The professor agreed to avoid using pronouns altogether and just use the student's last name, but that compromise wasn't accepted. Suffering well: disability and a faith that's big enough for pain Joni Eareckson Tada "understands that members of Christ’s body who can’t walk, or see, or interact on the same level as others are not only indispensable parts of the Kingdom of God, but are needed by the rest of us for our own edification and sanctification. Unfortunately, many of us in the church fail to grasp this." Porn addiction? Is it helpful to describe the hold pornography has as being an addition? Mark Sanders writes first, on 3 ways that the "disease model" – likening the pull of pornography to addiction – can be helpful. And in a follow-up article, he notes how this description falls short.  Parenting 001 In this oldie but goodie, Kevin DeYoung shares how his kids make it hard to parent like Paul Tripp - this isn't Parenting 101; DeYoung isn't that advanced. But he is funny and encouraging. (h/t to Walter Walraven) More upsets in Human Evolution "If you like scientific truths that become untrue every year or month, join the paleoanthropology guild. Anything you are told about human evolution today doesn’t match what National Geographic was proclaiming as scientific truth in the 1960s, and will probably be overturned next year." Creation/Evolution Headlines's David Coppedge has collected some of the newest human evolution discoveries that are rewriting the "facts." Heavenly Fire: the mystery of the Northern and Southern Lights (7 minutes) A stunning look into how the Auoras are created by the energy of the Sun, and how our planet's magnetic field protects us from solar radiation. As Dr. Paul Nelson puts it, "God gave us a world that, if we gave it half a chance, testifies of Him." ...

News

What’s in a name? Payless prank had people paying $600 for their shoes

Payless sells their shoes for as low as $20. So why were people paying $200, $400, and even $600 for their shoes a month before Christmas? It came down to a clever bit of rebranding. The discount shoe store hasn’t been doing well as of late, shutting down hundreds of stores last year, so in the lead-up to Christmas they were looking to make a splash. Their advertising agency proposed a publicity stunt: rent out an upscale retail location, stock it with regular Payless shoes, but relabel them as Palessi, charge 10 times more, and see if anyone buys. To really sell the stunt they decked the store out in avant-garde statues, and had champagne for the opening. It worked: as the Washington Post’s Kristine Phillips reported, at the grand opening customers gushed about the shoes. “‘I would pay $400, $500. People are going to be like, ‘Where did you get those? Those are amazing,’ a woman said as she tried on a pair of bright-gold sneakers with leopard prints.” “‘Palessi is just such high quality, high fashion, taking your shoe game up to the next level,’ said one man wearing spiked necklaces, holding a knee-high boot. ‘It looks really well made.’” “‘It’s just stunning. Elegant, sophisticated and versatile,’ said a woman, as she held a pair of floral stiletto heels.” Anyone who bought the shoes was taken to the back and let in on the stunt. And by way of an apology for the trick played on them, they were given their money back and given their shoes for free. It’s hilarious that anyone was willing to pay 1000% the going retail price – is this what it looks like to have more money than sense? But before we laugh too hard, let’s acknowledge that the trick – a new label disguising the same old, same old – is one that even a thrifty dutchman could fall for. What’s worse, it’s one we regularly pull on ourselves. After all, how often don’t we relabel our sins as mistakes? And we actually buy it! ...

News

Saturday Selections - Dec. 1, 2018

The lowly dandelion is way cooler than we knew Scientists have discovered that dandelions use a never-before-discovered means of flight. Parents, discipline is not about justice "Biblical discipline must not be seen as payment for the sins for which the discipline was administered. Retribution is not the goal of biblical discipline!" Turning the Christian Reformed Church into a LBGTQ ally Current and former members of the CRC recently met to figure out "the best strategy for turning the CRC into a denomination that celebrates the values of the homosexual and transgender ideology." This is an account of that meeting. Are You Attracted to Your Wife or Objectifying Her? "Do you love your wife because she’s the one you get to have sex with, or do you love having sex with her because you love your wife?" Take the no complaints challenge Here's six ways you can foster gratitude in your family. How overparenting backfired on parents When were you allowed to go outside and play on your own without adult supervision? ...

News, Politics

Backing away from Big Brother: government overreach doesn't just happen in China

Who should get to decide what information you see? And who would you trust with your own personal information? On the other side of the globe one government is taking on the dual role of data collector, and information gatekeeper. And while it is nowhere near that bad here at home, we do have reason for concern. Collecting and restricting information in China We've known for some time now that the Chinese government, via its "Great Firewall," restricts what information its citizens get to see. Social media giants like Facebook and Twitter have been blocked, as are many mainstream media sites like the National Post, New York Times and Wall Street Journal (though Reformed Perspective seems to have slipped past the censors' notice).  While search giant Google is also banned (as are their Gmail and Youtube properties) it's being reported that they are now willing to comply with the Chinese government's restrictions. Google plans: "to launch a censored version of its search engine in China that will blacklist websites and search terms about human rights, democracy, religion, and peaceful protest." The company that once had as its slogan "Don't be evil" is now siding with the government censor. In addition to restricting the access its citizens have to information, it's also being reported that the Chinese government is collecting personal information on its citizens so it can assign everyone a "social credit" rating – a three digit number – that would increase or decrease based on behavior both online and off. That "social credit" rating would then be used to determine what services a citizen would be allowed to receive. If you behave, you can book flights. But if, like journalist Liu Hu, you publish claims critical of the government, you may find yourself ground-bound. There is some dispute (even among writers appearing in the same magazine) about just how far along China is in developing this social credit system. It is a work in progress with the grand unveiling planned for 2020, even as local experiments are already taking place. But even in its unfinished state, there is interest from overseas. Venezuela is getting Chinese help to implement their own system and Reuters is reporting the information the Venezuelan government is collecting seems to include not only phone numbers and home addresses but "emails... participation at Socialist Party events and even whether a person owns a pet." Closer to home In the West we are still quite free, but even here the government's data collection is expanding. And the government also restricts our access to information. Starting in January, the Canadian government is planning to compel banks to give them the personal banking records of 500,000 citizens. It promises to use the information only to analyze overall trends, and not to look at any individuals. But it is doing so without the individuals' permission or knowledge. The same government asked businesses for information as to their position on abortion if they wanted to qualify for funding under the summer jobs program. And they only received the funding if they were pro-choice. When it comes to restricting information, the Ontario government tried to keep the province's abortion statistics secret, and it was only a successful 2017 court challenge that made that information available again. And whereas parental notification and consent is required for school field trips, in Canada and parts of the US abortionists don't need to tell parents when their underage children are getting an abortion. More recently, in Alberta the government has passed a bill banning schools from informing a child's parents that their child has joined a Gay/Straight Alliance club. That's information that the government has decided parents don't need to have. Bigger and bigger In China, the government manages every aspect of its citizens' lives, from where they might be allowed to live to how many children a couple is allowed to have. It's hardly surprising that a government that's already this intrusive doesn't recognize any limits on what it can do. Here in the West, our governments do less than the communist state, but perhaps more than we really realize. A partial list of what we expect from the government shows that in Canada, too, there is hardly an area of our lives untouched by the government. Canadians expect our government to: supplement our retirement income deliver our mail provide us with national radio and TV stations provide care for us when we are sick ensure there are affordable places to live when we are old create summer jobs for our teens verify the safety of our food build recreation centers and neighborhood playgrounds subsidize the creation of professional hockey arenas educate our children help provide daycare for them before school pay for abortion provide euthanasia Some of these responsibilities are small and some are enormous. It's hardly surprising, then, that Prime Minister Trudeau wants more information and defends his government's data grab by arguing government decisions need to be based on evidence. Can we really expect a government to mind its own business after we've invited it to take on some of the biggest responsibilities in our lives? It would seem our lives are their business. Backing away from Big Brother In China the government has taken on the role of Big Brother, dominating all of life...but that's not how it thinks of itself. Big Brother never thinks of itself as Big Brother - it looks in the mirror and sees a kind benevolent Nanny State whose only concern is the care of its citizens because, well, citizens aren't really capable of caring for themselves, are they? In the West we might think ours is still the kind and gentle Nanny State – we are grateful for its provision of free healthcare, and free education. But it is in those two roles - those two enormous roles - that our government is also doing its worst, providing the facilities or funding for the murder of one-quarter of its citizens. And that doesn't even include the murders it now manages of the elderly! The Alberta government wants to use its educational role to teach children that the State, not God, is supreme. That's a recent development, but for years now the government has been teaching our children the very opposite of God's Truth when it comes to sex, marriage, human worth, the environment, and much more. So if our Nanny State isn't already Big Brother, we can certainly see how natural the progression will be. What can we do about it? This is a massive problem, so there's any number of fronts on which we can take up this battle. But perhaps a useful first step is to consider the warning Samuel gives in 1 Samuel 8:10-22  against relying on the power of kings. If we demand that someone rule over us, rule they shall, but it's quite likely they will not rule as we hoped. When the government directed summer jobs funding to only pro-choice companies, Christians were outraged at the favoritism. But what few considered was, why were we expecting the government to fund summer job creation in the first place? To do it they have to take money from some companies – and doing so limits those companies' opportunities to create jobs – to give to other companies to fund their summer jobs. From the start, such a program involved the government rewarding some at the expense of others. And when we expect the government to pick winners and losers, why would we be surprised when it decides the winners need to think like they do? Lord Acton gave a warning that matches up well with Samuel's: "Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely." If we want a less arrogant government, it would help if we started asking for a much smaller one. This will appear in the November/December issue of the magazine POSTSCRIPT: A couple of points to ponder Q1: ARPA Canada and many other Christian groups protested the government's discriminatory summer job program requirements. If, as this article argues, the government shouldn't be expected to create summer jobs, was it misguided to protest the discriminatory nature of the program? Shouldn't the protest have targeted the program itself? A: When there are two wrongs to right, is it misguided to take them on one at a time? The discriminatory nature of the program was the far more topical issue and the more winnable one. It made good sense to take it on first. Q2: If we wanted a smaller government, where could we begin? Where could we ask it to do less? A: Two of the government's biggest expenditures are healthcare and education. Even if the government continued to fund both why do they need to provide both? If parents directed educational funding to the school of their choice that would put them back in charge of their children's education. That's a step in the right direction....

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