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News

Saturday Selections – Feb. 2, 2019

New government regulations shut down church program feeding the homeless Everyone understands that because government laws impact thousands and even millions, the government won't be able to anticipate all the consequences their laws will have...like shutting down a mission that fed homeless people. But why don't we see those unforeseen consequences – those unanticipated harms – as a reason for the government not to make many laws? Homeschooling parents in Germany lose right to educate their children Parental rights aren't just fragile in Germany (and Alberta and BC, etc.). Many attacks are government-led, but this past month a social media campaign was begun to #ExposeChristianSchools, asking people to share their horrible experiences in Christian schools. However, as WORLD magazine's Laura Edghill shares, Christians took the opportunity to "expose" the wonderful and caring education they received. Reformed seminary president is now NFL coach Many are happy that a sincere, Reformed, and very public, Christian is now the coach of the Indianapolis Colts. But this former Reformed seminary president is also very publicly working on Sunday, and what message does that send? When your child is disobedient... When a child sins, parents often deal with just the immediate act. But sin is a process and parents need to deal with how our child got there in the first place. Here's how to tell if scientists are exaggerating If they can't explain simpler things, then we have no reason to believe scientists when they say they've got something far more complicated all figured out. What is money? (1 hour) If you've ever wondered what money is, and how it gets its value, this 1-hour documentary will be intriguing. It is funded by Steve Forbes, a gold-standard proponent, and while it allows opponents to be heard, that bias does come out. You can watch the trailer below, and the whole documentary here.

News

26 richest people own as much as the world's poorest 3.75 billion

The 26 richest people on the planet hold as much wealth as the poorest 50% of the world’s population. So says the Oxfam Inequality Report 2019 released this January. That quite the statistic – it’s a disparity that will surprise and stun many. But why is Oxfam sharing it? To foster covetousness. Of course, that’s not how they present their case. They speak of fairness. They think it obviously unfair that the 26 people at the top have as much as the 3.75 billion on the bottom. But what the report doesn’t detail is how these 26 got their wealth. No accusations of theft are made. We know God hates for the powerful to oppress the poor (Prov. 22:16, 22-23) but Oxfam doesn’t even try to make the case that this is how the rich gained their money. The report details the dire circumstances the poor face around the world, but no linkage is made between their poverty and wickedness done by the rich. Still, isn’t it obviously wrong that so few have so much, when so many have so little? To answer that question properly, we need to view things biblically. In Scripture we find God repeatedly calling on us to help the poor (Prov. 28:27, 31:9, etc.). And at the very same time in the 10thCommandment – Do not covet – He makes it clear He doesn’t want us concerned with what the rich have. Poverty is a problem to be tackled, but the God who made Solomon wealthier than any before him nowhere speaks of “fixing” wealth inequality. How can the God who wants us to help the poor also tell us not to concern ourselves with the wealth of the rich? Aren’t the two related? No. That’s the lesson the Oxfam needs to learn. Abraham prospered, but his increased wealth didn’t come at the expense of anyone else (Genesis 14:23). Similarly, a successful businessman doesn't become rich by taking from the poor. Unless he steals, the only way he can become wealthy is by making others wealthier too. He can only sell us his $10 widget if we think he’s delivering more than $10 worth of value. After all, if we don’t think it's worth more than the asking price, why would we trade our money for it? If we do make that exchange, not only is the widget-maker wealthier (he’s up $10!) we're wealthier too because we now own a widget that’s worth much more than $10 to us! The Oxfam Report laments the wealth of the super-rich. They see it as representing good that could be, but isn't being, done – they see it as good withheld. What they don't understand is that this wealth represents enormous good already done – every dollar representing more than a dollar’s worth of wealth given to their customers. (And we haven't even touched on how these 26 people’s wealth is tied up in companies that bring further benefits by employing millions.) There will always be a temptation to look over our back fence at what our rich neighbor has. But when God calls on us to help the poor, He's calling on us to help the poor....

News

Saturday Selections - January 19

Defending the unborn can be as simple as asking the other side to explain themselves   Marie Kondo and her "life-changing magic"  Marie Kondo and her book, The life-changing magic of tidying up, has taken over the Internet and inspired many to throw out and simplify. But like every other secular "life-changing formula" it is so very incomplete. “Unborn Child” – remembering a musical plea for life John Stonestreet tells the story of the pro-life song below, that came out just one year after Roe vs. Wade. UNBORN CHILDOh little baby, you'll never cry, nor will you hear a sweet lullabye. Oh unborn child, if you only knew just what your momma was plannin' to do. You're still a-clingin' to the tree of life, but soon you'll be cut off before you get ripe. Oh unborn child, beginning to grow inside your momma, but you'll never know. Oh tiny bud, that grows in the womb, only to be crushed before you can bloom. Mama stop! Turn around, go back, think it over. Now stop, turn around, go back, think it over. Stop, turn around, go back think it over. Oh no momma, just let it be. You'll never regret it, just wait and see. Think of all the great ones who gave everything That we might have life here, so please bear the pain. Mama stop! Turn around, go back, think it over. Now stop, turn around, go back, think it over. Stop, turn around, go back think it over. The new taboo: More people regret sex change and want to "detransition" The National Post carried a story that few other media outlets are willing to cover... Going Dutch: Netherlands imports Nashville Statement controversy The US evangelical document on LGBT issues has divided the Dutch Bible Belt. "Seek Social Justice" - a free six-session course available This course features Albert Mohler, Marvin Olasky, Chuck Colson, and you can access it at the link above (and you can watch the trailer below).   ...

News

Who do you want to know better?

In a holiday ad (for Spanish speakers) the furniture giant IKEA gathered several families, seating each clan around a large table where a holiday feast was prepared with all the trimmings. Then a quiz started: if a person answered the question correctly they could stay and keep eating, but if they got something wrong they had to leave. Initially, everyone found the quiz easy, correctly answering questions like: What animal filters can you find on Instagram stories? Can you demonstrate the “swish swish” (or “floss”) dance? What is the latest Instagram feature? Can you finish a lyric from this current song? What does this text message abbreviation mean? How did this celebrity couple meet? But when the questions became more personal the answers stopped coming: How did your parents meet? What exactly is your dad’s job? What degrees does your grandma have? What’s your son’s favorite group? What’s your wife’s dream? What has your mother been studying recently? Some family members tried to guess the right answer, but one after another, sons and daughters, mothers and fathers, grandparents too, had to get up and leave. Finally, there was one solitary figure remaining, a lonely grandpa. A teen daughter summed up the embarrassment everyone felt: “What I’ve discovered is that I don’t know as much about my family as I do about some celebrities.” There was a happy ending. Everyone was invited back to the table, but this time smartphones were placed in a box in the middle of the table and the lid was firmly affixed....

News

Saturday Selections – Jan. 12, 2019

Parents, should we pay our children to do their chores and homework? This isn't a specifically Christian article, but it makes a point worth considering. Teach your teen how to read their Bible Our kids need to be given some basic tools to be able to read and understand the Bible. Here's some practical and helpful tips on how to equip them. Are you helping your children to despise themselves? If we let our children get away with disobedience we are teaching them to hate wisdom... and also hate themselves. When we smile... We've all experienced the power of a smile to change the mood of a room - a chipper, cheerful dad home from work can lift up the whole house, and a happy mom, ready to tickle her pre-schooler, can change that little one's trajectory for the entire day. As this article details, smiles also seem to benefit the smiler too. The sheer scale of God's creation Voyager 2 just left our Solar System and it will take another 40,000 years to reach the next nearest star... The Corner Room's rendition of Psalm 119:33-40 Wow. ...

News

RP's 2018 in review...and plans for the future

To see what Reformed Perspective has been up to, and hear about our plans for the future, check out our 2018-year-in-review video below. If you like the work we're doing, will you consider becoming a month supporter? Help us "equip and encourage Christians to think, speak, and act in a manner consistent with their confession." You can find out how on our donors page here. You can also find us via: The RP Roundup (our weekly email newsletter), Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. ...

News

Miss Universe pageant decides gender is only skin deep

The annual Miss Universe beauty contest was held this past Sunday, and while the winner was Miss Philippines, most of the attention was on a contestant who didn’t make it past the preliminary round. Miss Spain, Angela Ponce, made history by being the pageant’s first transgender contestant – a man was now on stage with the women. In 2012, the Miss Universe organization eliminated its requirement that contestants had to be “naturally born” women, making Ponce’s appearance this year possible. But the pageant isn’t doing away with all their rules: women over 28 are still out, as are married or divorced women. In addition, the swimsuit/athletic wear requirement excludes women who find that style of dress immodest, eliminating much of the Muslim world, the Amish, and also Orthodox Jews. Finally, contestants can’t ever have been pregnant. Even as the media was celebrating the pageant’s historic inclusion of all sorts of “women” it was continuing to exclude all sorts of women, banning them on the basis of age, marital status, or religion (those modest Muslims and others). The pageant wasn't acting consistent with their professed “inclusive” values. But that the organizers aren't exactly deep thinkers shouldn’t surprise us; these are folks who evaluate a woman based on how she fills out a bikini. What’s funny is how far the pageant is willing to go to accommodate men. Consider their ban on contestants who’ve been pregnant. This actually tilts the field in favor of transgender contestants because it can only be applied against genuine women – Angela Ponce can’t ever get pregnant....

News

Top 10 articles of 2018

The top ten posts of 2018 show that Reformed folk have had wide-ranging interests this past year... #10. Movie Review: “I survived ‘I Kissed Dating Goodbye’” I Kissed Dating Goodbye was huge in Christian circles, selling more than a million copies. This year a documentarian, along with the author himself, critiqued the impact the book has had over the last two decades. It's a very good documentary, if an overly critical one, and if you read to the bottom of the review there's a link there to where you can watch it for free. #9. Why do we suffer? Buddhism vs. Christianity The readership for this article keeps growing. It didn't make it to the Top 10 back in 2017 when it was first published, but every month hundreds more would track it down, giving it a place on the list in 2018. #8. Is recreational marijuana sinful? This is another 2017 article. It returned to the Top 10 when Canada legalized marijuana and this question became a pressing one for the Church. #7. War through the eyes of a child: Alice Kuik shares her memories of World War II Little Alice didn’t know her parents were hiding Jews in their home. But she did understand the Nazis were watching their whole family. #6. When we have to parent our parents Sharon Bratcher offers some help and encouragement for caregivers. #5. What’s next? The growth of Statism in Canada ARPA Canada’s André Schutten on the government requiring citizens to comply with its State ideology. #4. Should we baptize our infants? Resources that make the case On the evening of Sept. 27, 2018, two Reformed pastors debated "Should we baptize infants as well as adults?" Reformed Perspective holds to a paedobaptism position, and in preparation for the debate, we shared a list of some of the very best resources available in defense of infant baptism. #3. Ronald Reagan's challenge to his dying atheist father-in-law Thirty-six years after Reagan wrote this private letter to his father-in-law, God used it to challenge hundreds of thousands of others. #2. Chick-fil-A is always closed on Sunday...except when an ox falls in a pit This was an encouraging story about how a restaurant chain in the US recognizes that the Sabbath was made for man, and not man for the Sabbath (Mark 2:27). **** And the number one post of 2018 was... #1. Is Jordan Peterson the champion we've been looking for? Jordan Peterson was all over the Internet in 2018, and in many of the interviews and appearances, he sounded quite like a Christian, talking with respect about Jesus, or speaking of "the Word become divine." He also emphasized personal responsibility, telling his 20-something-year-old followers that if they really want to change the world, it starts with self-discipline – you can't refashion society if you can't even manage to put your socks in the laundry. It was old-fashioned common sense that's becoming increasingly uncommon outside of the Church. To top it off, he'd continue talking, even when he was getting attacked for what he believed. His courage was admirable and unusual, and it made many in his audience hope all the more that he was Christian – here, finally, was someone displaying the courage of a David before Goliath, or a Daniel in the lions' den. But as Joel McDurmon explains in his article, Peterson isn't a Christian at all. The reason he sounds like one is because he is a Jungian and he believes that the world's myths tell us something important about Man. In his view, the tales of Thor, the 12 labors of Hercules, the voyage of Odysseus, and yes, also the life of Jesus, have stayed with us because they all capture something important about who we are. Peterson respects the Bible more than other myths, because of its greater impact on the world. But he doesn't believe it to be God's very words. Peterson doesn't believe that Jesus died for his sins; despite how he often sounds, he is not Christian. And instead of pointing people to Christ, he is telling them to pull themselves up by their own bootstraps....

News

Saturday Selections - December 15, 2018

Merry Christmas from the moon On Dec. 24, 1968, three American astronauts, orbiting the moon for the first time ever, had an opportunity to give a Christmas address to one billion listening people. They chose to read Genesis 1. Using PragerU to engage the minds of your kids Tim Barnett on how, even though you won't agree with all PragerU's videos, you may find them absolutely fantastic 5-minute conversation-starters for you and your kids about things that matter. Your gut is wrong Our gut instinct is to downplay parts of the Bible that don't sound so pleasant to us, or, we suspect, to new listeners. "Jesus is the one and only way to God (John 14:6). The hearer’s gut reaction is: 'That can’t be right! It just feels wrong.' The question that soon follows is: 'Does that mean that all the other religions in the world are wrong?' When we reply 'yes,' the offense of our response can be felt." "Sadly we also see it in our churches amongst Christians. When we teach on some of those (supposedly) trickier passages, such as God’s good design for human sexuality and the role of men and women, the initial gut reaction is often anything but positive. It’s not that congregations want to openly rebel against God’s word, it’s just that 'it doesn’t feel right.'” Climate scientists aren't economists (and a few other obvious things we tend to forget) The Cornwall Alliance's E. Calvin Beisner (and National Review's Jonah Goldberg) on how, even if we were to grant that climate change is a problem, why would we think climate scientists know the best way forward? The New York Times reveals serious problems with Transgender Ideology The folks at Breakpoint highlight a Times article on the harmful natures of transgender surgeries. Was Jesus just a good teacher? Greg Koukl, channeling C.S. Lewis, with a short video perfect for sharing on Facebook, Twitter, and everywhere, to help us talk about Jesus this season. ...

News, Politics

Backing away from Big Brother: government overreach doesn't just happen in China

Who should get to decide what information you see? And who would you trust with your own personal information? On the other side of the globe one government is taking on the dual role of data collector, and information gatekeeper. And while it is nowhere near that bad here at home, we do have reason for concern. Collecting and restricting information in China We've known for some time now that the Chinese government, via its "Great Firewall," restricts what information its citizens get to see. Social media giants like Facebook and Twitter have been blocked, as are many mainstream media sites like the National Post, New York Times and Wall Street Journal (though Reformed Perspective seems to have slipped past the censors' notice).  While search giant Google is also banned (as are their Gmail and Youtube properties) it's being reported that they are now willing to comply with the Chinese government's restrictions. Google plans: "to launch a censored version of its search engine in China that will blacklist websites and search terms about human rights, democracy, religion, and peaceful protest." The company that once had as its slogan "Don't be evil" is now siding with the government censor. In addition to restricting the access its citizens have to information, it's also being reported that the Chinese government is collecting personal information on its citizens so it can assign everyone a "social credit" rating – a three digit number – that would increase or decrease based on behavior both online and off. That "social credit" rating would then be used to determine what services a citizen would be allowed to receive. If you behave, you can book flights. But if, like journalist Liu Hu, you publish claims critical of the government, you may find yourself ground-bound. There is some dispute (even among writers appearing in the same magazine) about just how far along China is in developing this social credit system. It is a work in progress with the grand unveiling planned for 2020, even as local experiments are already taking place. But even in its unfinished state, there is interest from overseas. Venezuela is getting Chinese help to implement their own system and Reuters is reporting the information the Venezuelan government is collecting seems to include not only phone numbers and home addresses but "emails... participation at Socialist Party events and even whether a person owns a pet." Closer to home In the West we are still quite free, but even here the government's data collection is expanding. And the government also restricts our access to information. Starting in January, the Canadian government is planning to compel banks to give them the personal banking records of 500,000 citizens. It promises to use the information only to analyze overall trends, and not to look at any individuals. But it is doing so without the individuals' permission or knowledge. The same government asked businesses for information as to their position on abortion if they wanted to qualify for funding under the summer jobs program. And they only received the funding if they were pro-choice. When it comes to restricting information, the Ontario government tried to keep the province's abortion statistics secret, and it was only a successful 2017 court challenge that made that information available again. And whereas parental notification and consent is required for school field trips, in Canada and parts of the US abortionists don't need to tell parents when their underage children are getting an abortion. More recently, in Alberta the government has passed a bill banning schools from informing a child's parents that their child has joined a Gay/Straight Alliance club. That's information that the government has decided parents don't need to have. Bigger and bigger In China, the government manages every aspect of its citizens' lives, from where they might be allowed to live to how many children a couple is allowed to have. It's hardly surprising that a government that's already this intrusive doesn't recognize any limits on what it can do. Here in the West, our governments do less than the communist state, but perhaps more than we really realize. A partial list of what we expect from the government shows that in Canada, too, there is hardly an area of our lives untouched by the government. Canadians expect our government to: supplement our retirement income deliver our mail provide us with national radio and TV stations provide care for us when we are sick ensure there are affordable places to live when we are old create summer jobs for our teens verify the safety of our food build recreation centers and neighborhood playgrounds subsidize the creation of professional hockey arenas educate our children help provide daycare for them before school pay for abortion provide euthanasia Some of these responsibilities are small and some are enormous. It's hardly surprising, then, that Prime Minister Trudeau wants more information and defends his government's data grab by arguing government decisions need to be based on evidence. Can we really expect a government to mind its own business after we've invited it to take on some of the biggest responsibilities in our lives? It would seem our lives are their business. Backing away from Big Brother In China the government has taken on the role of Big Brother, dominating all of life...but that's not how it thinks of itself. Big Brother never thinks of itself as Big Brother - it looks in the mirror and sees a kind benevolent Nanny State whose only concern is the care of its citizens because, well, citizens aren't really capable of caring for themselves, are they? In the West we might think ours is still the kind and gentle Nanny State – we are grateful for its provision of free healthcare, and free education. But it is in those two roles - those two enormous roles - that our government is also doing its worst, providing the facilities or funding for the murder of one-quarter of its citizens. And that doesn't even include the murders it now manages of the elderly! The Alberta government wants to use its educational role to teach children that the State, not God, is supreme. That's a recent development, but for years now the government has been teaching our children the very opposite of God's Truth when it comes to sex, marriage, human worth, the environment, and much more. So if our Nanny State isn't already Big Brother, we can certainly see how natural the progression will be. What can we do about it? This is a massive problem, so there's any number of fronts on which we can take up this battle. But perhaps a useful first step is to consider the warning Samuel gives in 1 Samuel 8:10-22  against relying on the power of kings. If we demand that someone rule over us, rule they shall, but it's quite likely they will not rule as we hoped. When the government directed summer jobs funding to only pro-choice companies, Christians were outraged at the favoritism. But what few considered was, why were we expecting the government to fund summer job creation in the first place? To do it they have to take money from some companies – and doing so limits those companies' opportunities to create jobs – to give to other companies to fund their summer jobs. From the start, such a program involved the government rewarding some at the expense of others. And when we expect the government to pick winners and losers, why would we be surprised when it decides the winners need to think like they do? Lord Acton gave a warning that matches up well with Samuel's: "Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely." If we want a less arrogant government, it would help if we started asking for a much smaller one. This will appear in the November/December issue of the magazine POSTSCRIPT: A couple of points to ponder Q1: ARPA Canada and many other Christian groups protested the government's discriminatory summer job program requirements. If, as this article argues, the government shouldn't be expected to create summer jobs, was it misguided to protest the discriminatory nature of the program? Shouldn't the protest have targeted the program itself? A: When there are two wrongs to right, is it misguided to take them on one at a time? The discriminatory nature of the program was the far more topical issue and the more winnable one. It made good sense to take it on first. Q2: If we wanted a smaller government, where could we begin? Where could we ask it to do less? A: Two of the government's biggest expenditures are healthcare and education. Even if the government continued to fund both why do they need to provide both? If parents directed educational funding to the school of their choice that would put them back in charge of their children's education. That's a step in the right direction....

News

Saturday Selections - Nov. 17, 2018

Canadian doctors get ready for child euthanasia Doctors and bioethicists associated with the children's hospital in Toronto are pushing to be "allowed to euthanize 'capable minors'... without parental consent or even their notification." And a hospital waiting room in Canada is now promoting euthanasia. The effects of childlessness on the elderly A new study finds that elderly parents who have three or more children and who have weekly contact with them are the happiest seniors. We should let the world know. Mother-to-mother gospel opportunities Mothers are often looking for parenting advice and that gives us an opportunity to share, not mere moralisms, but the good news of the gospel! Before your kids get a smartphone...a question to ask The folks at Breakpoint have a question you should ask if your children have a smartphone on their Christmas wishlist. And related to that, researchers have now shown that social media use increases depression and loneliness. Good lovemaking is about God "God ordains lovemaking for couples when we are richer or poorer, in sickness and in health, when life is better or worse — until death do us part — because it reflects his enduring love for us." The Wild Brothers have a vlog! The Wild Brothers are four brothers who are part of a missionary family – the Wilds – living in Indonesia. They originally had their own  eight-episode "reality series" about their lives, published on DVD by Answers in Genesis. It was a family-friendly series that children and parents could all enjoy, showing both the challenges of life among the natives in the highlands of Indonesia, and the joys. And, of course, there were all sorts of exotic animals and locales for them to share with us. Now the brothers have their own vlog – Highlands to Island – with eight short (roughly 10-minute) episodes so far. I've only watched the first, but based on the DVD series, this should be good! ...

News

Saturday Selections - Nov. 3, 2018

Do you read the Bible literally? Stand to Reason's Greg Koukl on how reading the Bible literally isn't the same as reading it woodenly (10-minute read). Tortured for Christ – a free film everyone needs to see Wurmbrand: "If I speak now, you will have no husband." His wife: "I don't need a coward for a husband." Tortured for Christ is a must-see film about Richard Wurmbrand's courageous and faithful stand against the Communists when they took over Romania. This is not family viewing, but it is a film older teens and up should see to understand how much more outspoken we should dare to be, and how faithful God is to his children in the most desperate of circumstances. In that way it is an incredibly encouraging film. While the subject matter includes torture, it does so with as much delicacy as is possible. But there is a reason they left it at only one hour – it would be too much if it was longer. It can be viewed at the link above - they ask you to consider a donation, but there is a link to watch it for free (near the bottom or on the right-hand side) on that page. Are women real? Our society, on one hand, holds that men can never understand women’s struggle and, at the same time, insists that men can become women. Clearly, something has to give. Motherhood and the "Wage Gap" Women, averaged overall, make less than men, but that's because they have prioritized something else over making money – having children. Society is presumptuous to act like that is a choice that needs correcting. Why sex is the best argument for creation The director of Is Genesis History? presents an attention-getting argument for God's design. For another aspect of the incredible design evident in sexual reproduction, check out Dr. David Menton on The Placenta. World War I in color Director Peter Jackson (best known for his Lord of the Rings trilogy) has created a documentary on the First World War using the original footage, first cleaning it up, then colorizing it, hiring lip readers to figure out what the soldiers are saying (the original footage is silent), and hiring Hollywood actors to give these soldiers a voice again. The film has already played in Britain, and won't play in North America until later this year, but even the trailer is fascinating for how it makes these men – these boys – come back to us as real people. ...

News

Saturday Selections - Oct. 27, 2018

Should prostitution be legal? An important one to watch....but not with the kids around What happy teens do By one measure, a third of teens struggle with anxiety. So what do happy teens do differently? Some cautions concerning Fortnite More than 100 million play Fortnite, so this parent and political scientist decided to take a look. Evangelicals are confused (but a fantastic free book might help) Ligonier Ministries has put out their 2018 survey on "The State of Theology" and it turns out Evangelical Americans are very confused about the core of the Gospel, with a majority thinking most people are good at heart, and that you can worship God through Islam and Judaism. But, while this confusion is distressing, Ligonier Ministries is doing what it can to correct it, by offering a free download of R.C. Sproul's incredibly readable Everyone's a Theologian (you do have to give them your email, but you can always unsubscribe). So check out the survey results, and then scroll to the bottom for a book that is simply a must-have for any Christian. Peer-reviewed Pranksters Three liberal professors set out to show if a paper was couched in enough politically-correct phraseology, it would get accepted by many peer-reviewed academic journals....even if the paper itself was sheer nonsense. 3 things to remember when you are anxious David Powilson on how anxiety is universal and understandable, and we can take comfort in knowing God is in control. ...

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