Assorted

…but I have a couch

Rosaria Butterfield’s The Gospel Comes With A House Key came highly recommended, and after reading it I understand why. Rosaria is honest and insightful. She shares examples of hospitality gleaned from her own experiences, from feeding popsicles to the neighborhood children, to squeezing as many people as possible into their home on a snowy Sabbath when church was canceled. It seems that there are extra people in the Butterfield home so often that they expect to see non-family members at their dinner table and regularly make too-large meals to accommodate the guests.

Upon finishing the book I felt inspired to be more hospitable, to invite all my neighbors over for chili and Bible reading. So I put down the book and looked up – up at the small kitchen/living room of my one-bedroom apartment, and my heart sank because there’s no way I could fit fifty people into my home, and this truth became incredibly clear: I cannot do hospitality like the Butterfields.

So what do you do, when you feel convicted and inspired to obey God but you just don’t know how to do it? You pray. Well, I prayed, and as I sat on my couch, asking God how to do hospitality for Him, a new concept came to me.

There is a reason I cannot do hospitality like the Butterfields. God has not put me in a house with a husband and given me the occupation of a stay-at-home, homeschooling mom. He has put me by myself in a one-bedroom apartment with a schedule that requires me to work at least two evenings a week. In short, I can’t do hospitality like the Butterfields because I’m not a Butterfield. But God’s command to be hospitable does not say “be hospitable like the Butterfields” (nor does Rosaria say that in her book) but simply “show hospitality” (1 Peter 4:9). The question we all have to answer is how?

Perhaps the most helpful and practical thing to do is to look around and recognize what you have, and then be intentional about using what you do have to obey God. For example, I don’t have a large space, but I do have a couch. So, I now invite women to come share a pot of tea and sit on my couch and talk. That couch is just an ordinary, everyday thing, but it has become a tool to enhance the Kingdom of God. If it could talk it would tell you stories that would make you weep and laugh and weep again.

When we take the daily things God has given us and deliberately use them to serve Him, they cease being plain objects and start being tools consecrated to generate heavenly treasures.

We get intimidated by hospitality thinking that it has to be big and fancy. It doesn’t. It can be as simple as Oreo cookies and water, along with ears that listen. It can involve folding laundry and making soup, along with ears that listen. It can be shown around a campfire in your backyard or on your front patio or around your kitchen table or sitting on the floor…with ears that listen. People don’t care much where you are or what you serve them, as long as you prove yourself to be a safe person that they can share their lives with.

Sharing life usually doesn’t happen over the first cup of coffee, but it’s a beginning, and we’ll never get anywhere if we don’t start. Hospitality requires you to be intentional and loving and available, and it needs to be shown to fellow saints and neighbors and the least. Jesus showed hospitality by making people sit on the grass and by divvying up five loaves and two fish among them (Luke 9:10-17). His first concern wasn’t physical comfort or meeting social expectations, but to show people the Father. By His Spirit, may we follow His example and bring the living Savior to our dying world.


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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Margaret Hoekstra

    February 1, 2019 at 4:34 am

    Excellent. Hospitality is loving people, caring for them, and being open and welcoming. Decades ago, we were invited for supper to the house of a young couple. When we got there, they still had to go to the store to buy burgers and chips. Then they came home and barbecued for us. So simple! I remember feeling affronted that there wasn’t a meal simmering in the oven . But the conversation and fellowship was wonderful. This whole experience helped me see hospitality in a different light. Soup and buns or tuna sandwiches are ok. It ‘s people we need, and they need us. Rosaria’s book is challenging indeed, and I believe it’s what the Christian community needs.

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