Assorted

What does God’s “favorite” Bible verse tell us?

We all have our own favorite books, chapters, and verses in the Bible. I love the last 5 chapters of Job, where God answers Job and his friends. In a confusing world, I find this such a comforting passage – I may not understand why things are happening, but God does, He is in control, and I can trust to leave things with Him. My grandfather loved Ps. 23 for similar reasons – reading through it was a source of comfort for him.

Other passages are favorites for different reasons. When it comes to the verse we most often share with the world, it must be John 3:16, written up large on poster board and displayed at football, baseball and soccer stadiums around the globe. In 2009 this was the most read verse on BibleGateway.com.

The world’s favorite verse has to be Matthew 7:1a: “Do not judge.” They don’t want it in context – half a verse is more than enough Bible for them.

God’s favorite verses?

But what is God’s favorite Bible verse? In the last couple of months two Reformed authors have shared their thoughts. Dr. Joel McDurmon noted that, according to the number of times it is quoted in the New Testament, the clear second-place finisher is the latter part of Leviticus 19:18:

“You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

McDrumon writes: “This shows up in seven different places in the NT [while] the vast majority of other verses quoted appear a couple times, or only once.” Of course, it may not be quite right to think of this as God’s favorite – it might be better to think of this as a passage He knows we really need to hear over and over again.

So if that’s second, what’s first? Reformed Baptist pastor Jeff Durbin suggests it must be Psalm 110:1:

“The Lord says to my Lord: ‘Sit at my right hand, until I make your enemies your footstool.’”

This passage is cited or referenced nearly two dozen times in the New Testament, or three times as often as Leviticus 19:18.

An instructive contrast

What we read here is a proclamation of Jesus’ sovereignty – the focus is on His reign.

But when you google “favorite verses” the passages that often come up have a different focus. Spots 2 through 4 on the BibleGateway.com 2009 most-read-verses list had these familiar passages:

Jeremiah 29:11: “‘For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the LORD, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.'”

Romans 8:28: “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.”

Philippians 4:13: “I can do everything through him who gives me strength.”

Like my grandfather’s favorite, and my own, these passages are a source of comfort to many (though the Jeremiah and Philippians passages are often misapplied). While they do speak of God, the focus isn’t so much on Him as what He can do for us – the focus is largely on us.

Our loving Father knows what we we need, and so provides us with text after text that assure us of his goodness and power and love. It’s no wonder these are among our favorites – they are a gift from Him. But the difference between our favorites and God’s “favorite” is instructive. God wants us to understand that Jesus has triumphed. He wants us to realize that Jesus has won every battle, beaten every enemy, and rules over all. This is so important for us to understand, that God tells it to us again and again and again.

Are we listening? And do we believe it?

As the Westminster Shorter Catechism explains, our purpose here on earth is to glorify God, but we are so often scared and too timid to even mention His name. How can we glorify Someone we don’t dare name?

God wants to embolden us, telling us that Jesus already reigns. When we are intimidated by our professors, boss, coworkers, classmates, or political caucus, we can be assured that Jesus is king. He is Lord of our university classroom. He rules the business world and our job site too. And while government might seem to be spirally ever downward we can rest secure in the knowledge that God appoints both Prime Ministers and opposition leaders. His domain extends to everywhere and everything.

“The Lord says to my Lord: ‘Sit at my right hand, until I make your enemies your footstool.’”

Whether we’re looking for comfort or courage, can it get any better than that?

 

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Victoria

    July 6, 2017 at 2:26 pm

    Under the covenant of grace , the most comforting words of my Lord is John 17.

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