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Joe Biden and the unworkable, unbiblical (but I repeat myself) “believe all women” standard

The presumptive Democratic nominee for president, Joe Biden, was accused of sexual assault in late March, and most of the mainstream media, and a key member of the #MeToo movement, doesn’t want to hold him to the same standard he has proposed for others.

It was only two years ago that the former vice president supported a “believe all women” standard. When the Trump-nominated candidate for the US Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh, was publicly accused of sexually assaulting a woman, Biden told reporters:

“For a woman to come forward in the glaring lights of focus, nationally, you’ve got to start off with the presumption that at least the essence of what she’s talking about is real, whether or not she forgets facts, whether or not it’s been made worse or better over time. But nobody fails to understand that this is like jumping into a cauldron.”

But now it’s Biden in the crosshairs. In a podcast released March 24, one of Joe Biden’s former Senate staffers, Tara Reade, accused him of sexual assault. It is a case of she said/he said, with no corroborating witnesses to the alleged event. Biden has, through his campaign spokeswoman, denied the charge, but, of course, that’s what accused men do. So the obvious question is, why should we believe this man when this man has otherwise insisted we should believe women?

One of Biden’s defenders, actress Alyssa Milano, has been a public face for the #MeToo movement. But as ArcDigital.media‘s Cathy Young pointed out, when it was Republican nominee Kavanaugh being accused, Milano held to the same “believe all women” standard Biden was backing. Milano tweeted at the time:

You can’t pretend to be the party of the American people and then not support a woman who comes forward with her #MeToo story.

However, now that it’s Biden being accused, Milano wants to modify that position:

#BelieveWomen does not mean everyone gets to accuse anyone of anything and that’s that. It means that our societal mindset and default reaction shouldn’t be that women are lying.

Theirs hasn’t been the only hypocrisy evidenced. The mainstream media was slow to cover the accusation, with most waiting a couple of weeks or more before writing anything. If the lack of coverage had been due to them holding to a very different standard than the former vice president – if they believed that a reputable news organization can’t simply pass along every unsubstantiated accusation they hear – then their lack of coverage would have been understandable. But as commentators on both the Right and Left have noted, that hasn’t been the media’s standard in the past. The same CNN that took more than two weeks to mention Reade’s charges, reported the accusations against Kavanaugh immediately. The Christian satire site Babylon Bee summed up the extent of CNN‘s early coverage with their headline: “Cricket In CNN Newsroom Gives Detailed Report On Biden Allegations.”

But there something more noteworthy than the hypocrisy going on here. The #MeToo movement sprang to life in late 2017 when a number of women came forward to accuse Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment and sexual assault. Though Weinstein’s behavior had been an open secret for years he hadn’t faced this kind of negative attention before, because most of his encounters had involved just himself and the victim – like the accusation against Biden, they were mostly she said/he said situations. So, previously, victims hadn’t come forward because these women weren’t confident that they’d be believed when it was just one person’s word versus another’s.

So how can we help women who are victimized in circumstances in which there are no other witnesses?

The #MeToo movement proposed one sort of “solution” to this problem: always believe the women. The shortcoming to this approach was clear from the start though it took the Left until now, with their own guy getting accused, to finally realize it: women don’t always tell the truth.

There was always another solution available but, based as it is on biblical principles, it wasn’t their go-to. God says in Deut. 19:15:

One witness shall not rise against a man concerning any iniquity or any sin that he commits; by the mouth of two or three witnesses the matter shall be established.

If we, instead of pretending there is some way of picking one witness’s testimony over another, acknowledge that it can’t be done, we’ll be on our way to recognizing the risk that comes with one-on-one situations. And when we acknowledge that risk, then it’ll become clear, too, how to minimize it. The only way to protect a woman from victimization in one-on-one circumstance is to so craft our culture that it is unacceptable to suggest such private pairings. Hollywood agents who send their young starlets off to see a powerful Hollywood mogul alone in his suite should be understood to be encouraging sexual predation. And any US senator who went off with his young intern for alone-time would be publicly condemned for creepy behavior.

If we want to protect women from being victimized in one-on-one situations, we seem to have just the two choices. We either:

  1. Don’t believe a man
  2. Don’t have a man alone with a woman (other than his wife).

This second approach is, of course, the much-mocked “Billy Graham Rule.” Now that the Biden accusations have even the Left acknowledging the unworkability of the first approach, will they recognize the merits of the second?

And if they don’t, what alternative can they offer?

Picture is cropped from the original by Michael Stokes and used under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.


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