CD Review

CD REVIEWS: Bach and Beethoven for kids (and adults)

C.S. Lewis once made mention of a man who did not like children. Now some of our dislikes are simply a matter of taste – whether your favorite ice cream is chocolate or vanilla says nothing about your character – but this man recognized that his disregard for little ones was wrong. There is a beauty in little children, a wonder about what God has done in making these tiny new people that everyone really should appreciate. If a man doesn’t, it is because of something missing in the man. Lewis was making the point that there is such a thing as good and bad taste – all is not mere opinion.

When it comes to classical music I’m like this man. I’ve never appreciated it, but I recognize this as a deficiency in myself. I should like it. After all, this is music that has stood that test of time. We play Beethoven and Bach’s music centuries after it was first written; does anyone think the same will be done for Lady Gaga, Beyonce, or Justin Timberlake? Even those of us who don’t like Bach know that in a real tangible way he is better than Beyonce.

Since having kids I’ve hoped that my daughters’ musical tastes will be better developed than their dad’s. So I was very happy to come across these two CDs: Beethoven Lives Upstairs and Bach Comes to Call. Each is a dramatized account of the composer’s life, sprinkled throughout with a liberal dose of their music.

In Bach Comes to Call (47 min) Bach appears in modern times, under unexplained circumstances, to a girl who is having a hard time getting her piano homework done. The composer encourages young Elizabeth by telling her the story of his own childhood and musical triumphs.

In Beethoven Lives Upstairs (46 min) we are introduced to a little boy who has the misfortune to live below Beethoven’s apartment. Beethoven, it turns out, is demanding, short-tempered, and makes the strangest sounds as he paces in his room. The boy airs his complaints to an understanding uncle who teaches the young boy to empathize with this great composer, who hears wonderful music in his head, but who can no longer hear it with his ears. How very frustrating that must be!

A couple cautions to note. First, there is a moment in Beethoven Lives Upstairs that might lead to a little tittering. The boy complains that Beethoven was laughed at by little children who, while peering through his window, saw he was composing while wearing no clothes at all! Not a big thing, but it might have been nice to leave that detail out. Second, my wife and I have listened to other CDs and DVDs in this “Classical Kids” series and have yet to find any others we would want to recommend, so don’t assume they will all be good.

These two, however, are excellent, and a great way to foster a love of classical music in kids, and maybe even their dads.


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