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Is buy stocks like gambling? Two big differences

Some Christians won’t invest in the stock market because they believe that investing in stocks is really no different than buying a lottery ticket. Both, they argue, are examples of gambling, which God forbids. But are they really so alike? Consider these two ways in which investing in stocks differs completely gambling.

1. You can gain without causing pain

In gambling there is no way for all the players to win. The gambler’s goal is to get other people’s money while doing nothing for them – it is a zero sum game, with a fixed amount of money at the table. Your every gain happens only at the expense of someone else.  The gambler wishes to get something for nothing.

With stocks, it is very different. While the stock market has its ups and downs, over time the trajectory is ever upward, as the economy expands, and as we continue to learn how, through automation, to become ever more productive. That means it is possible for all investors – or at least all of the patient, cautious sort – to win. An investor’s gains need not come by making others lose; instead they can come from helping a good company grow. So an investor’s return can come from supporting companies that are creating good products, or offering wanted services, or in some other way, being productive in a way that paying customers appreciate. And then the return he gets will be in exchange for the help he provided: it will be something for something.

Of course, someone could buy stock in all sorts of evil companies too, so we’re not trying to say here that buying stocks is always good. Our point is more limited: whereas a gambler can only gain by other’s pain, it’s possible for an investor to gain by helping others.

2. You are likely to gain

Another problem with gambling is that it is a waste of the resources God has entrusted to us, because in gambling the odds are always stacked against the gambler. Slot machines, provincial lotteries, 50/50 raffles, casinos: all of them are a source of revenue for governments because they are designed to pay out less than they take in. Sure, a fellow might makes some short-term gains, but any gambler that keeps at it is sure to lose…and quite possibly everything he has.

But in the stock market the very opposite is true. If the economy is growing (as it is, at least over the long term) then the stock market will grow too, and see more gains than losses. If you have no other ideas as to what to do with your money, then placing it in a diversified portfolio is one of the safest places to put it. With minimal risk you can increase the resources God has entrusted to your care.

Conclusion

To sum up, whereas a gambler is always trying to win at others’ expense, stock market investors can gain by helping others do better too. And while the odds are stacked such that over time a gambler will lose all he has, stock market investments overall continue to grow over time.

In these two significant ways, buying stock is the very opposite of gambling.

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